Private Github Enterprise Alternatives

Github Enterprise is basically a local installation of the famous service at github for your company or organisation. Although it comes with a quite a pricetag. In this post I want to show some alternatives that allow you to run a git server on your private network or on any server on the web. Continue reading “Private Github Enterprise Alternatives”

MapBox – OpenStreetMap in beautiful

MapBox is a business that provide a fairly priced service for custom layouts for OpenStreetMap. I just wanted to share their showcase page, because I think that it’s great. It portraits what their clients did with their service and there’s some big names among them. They’ve got a dual functionality for web access and also access for native apps, which seems like a really good idea for consistent branding. Continue reading “MapBox – OpenStreetMap in beautiful”

Why Shells are Awesome

I’m a developer, I think shells are awesome. When I was in ninth grade I took a class in typing with the 10-finger system, which was a full year of typing dull things into an incredibly old DOS interface.
I took these classes, because I had a couple of those Linux magazines and the authors occasionally brought up how much faster things were if you just could use your keyboard, instead of your mouse. My problem was, that I couldn’t type perfectly without looking at the keyboard. Continue reading “Why Shells are Awesome”

Adobe Topcoat

Adobe Topcoat is a young css framework, focussed on building (web) apps. I’m putting the web in paranthesis, because it’s what seems to be used in the Adobe Edge Tools, which are stand alone applications, like the brackets editor, to be found at brackets.io.

At this point I’d like to state, that I should go wild with my predictions sometimes, because I think that this way of developing applications, that work on possibly both desktop and the web is going to be a trend with heavy growth. Now we have a css framework for applications of that kind. Continue reading “Adobe Topcoat”

PHP MVC: The Laravel Framework

The Laravel project has made a pretty smart move, that now is also in their quick start guide. They enable you to install it directly through composer! I’ve written about composer once when I ran into a little quirky bug on MacOS.

Using composer, which is a general dependency manager for PHP seems like a big step towards more interchangeable code between different PHP frameworks. I’ve briefly looked into Sparks some time ago, but it’s pretty specifically aimed at the CodeIgniter framework. Continue reading “PHP MVC: The Laravel Framework”

git tip: define a custom alias

Git provides a really, really powerful set of tools, which my brain can remember the most important ones of. Luckily, you can define alias’ for the commands that are nice to have, but probably a lot longer.

A quick collection of common shortcuts I’ve found in the git cheat sheet on errtheblog.com. Continue reading “git tip: define a custom alias”

Quick & Dirty: MarkDown to PDF

Writing from a developers point of view and writing from a PBA studies examinators point of view are very different things. Developers want to write code and slam documentation into MarkDown files they can track with git (assumption). PBA examinators want a footnote drenched, printable document, that belongs back in the 1970s (fact).

For my last hand-in I’ve created a quick & dirty script, that does just that to your MarkDown files. Continue reading “Quick & Dirty: MarkDown to PDF”

Quick & Dirty: Character Counting

Having to hit a character limit is not the smartest rule in our educational system, but I get where it comes from. To track the process of how far along one is, I’ve created a little script that counts characters in a couple of files at once and outputs it with some percentage calculations. Nothing fancy, but I’ve used this about 200 times in the past month, so I thought I’d share it. Continue reading “Quick & Dirty: Character Counting”

How to: Start any application from the terminal

Starting any application from the terminal can ease your workflows a lot. I’ve gotten used to being able to open files from the shell, when I’m working on a project. I navigate to the project folder and start editing, either markdown files for documentation or source code.

Usually I’d type gvim file.md and watch the gVim window open. Continue reading “How to: Start any application from the terminal”

Writing a book on GitLab

That is exactly what I am trying to achieve at the moment, a book on how to set up your private git server with GitLab. I can’t say too much about what will be in it or if it even will be published, since that is not entirely up to me. I’m doing my best to create the most useful content I can, both from research and experience with this great project.

I’ll just quickly get into, why I decided to actually write this book in the first place, when I was approached by a publisher.
Update: It’s been published, take a lookt at: GitLab Repository Management! Continue reading “Writing a book on GitLab”