Quick & Dirty: MarkDown to PDF

Writing from a developers point of view and writing from a PBA studies examinators point of view are very different things. Developers want to write code and slam documentation into MarkDown files they can track with git (assumption). PBA examinators want a footnote drenched, printable document, that belongs back in the 1970s (fact).

For my last hand-in I’ve created a quick & dirty script, that does just that to your MarkDown files. Continue reading “Quick & Dirty: MarkDown to PDF”

Quick & Dirty: Character Counting

Having to hit a character limit is not the smartest rule in our educational system, but I get where it comes from. To track the process of how far along one is, I’ve created a little script that counts characters in a couple of files at once and outputs it with some percentage calculations. Nothing fancy, but I’ve used this about 200 times in the past month, so I thought I’d share it. Continue reading “Quick & Dirty: Character Counting”

How to: Start any application from the terminal

Starting any application from the terminal can ease your workflows a lot. I’ve gotten used to being able to open files from the shell, when I’m working on a project. I navigate to the project folder and start editing, either markdown files for documentation or source code.

Usually I’d type gvim file.md and watch the gVim window open. Continue reading “How to: Start any application from the terminal”

Writing a book on GitLab

That is exactly what I am trying to achieve at the moment, a book on how to set up your private git server with GitLab. I can’t say too much about what will be in it or if it even will be published, since that is not entirely up to me. I’m doing my best to create the most useful content I can, both from research and experience with this great project.

I’ll just quickly get into, why I decided to actually write this book in the first place, when I was approached by a publisher.
Update: It’s been published, take a lookt at: GitLab Repository Management! Continue reading “Writing a book on GitLab”

Why I believe in MarkDown

When I first learned of MarkDown I was torn between having to write academical papers in software like Microsoft Word or Apple’s Pages. Both are surely functional Programs, even though I’d always preferred Open or Libre Office, for the sake of standards and an open world.

In my studies as a Multimedia Designer in Denmark I even handed in some papers that were written in HTML and compiled to PDF.

That clearly was not the most practical, but for me the most bearable of these alternatives. Plain text is just great, especially for people who write a lot or the ones that code on a somewhat daily basis. Continue reading “Why I believe in MarkDown”

Ghost: Blogging Platform on node.js: I backed!

I just backed Ghost on Kickstarter. Ghost is, according to the ambitious authors, going to be a blogging platform based on node.js, that will be extendable with plugins and themes, like WordPress.

My incentive for throwing in 10£ was that backers get a month early access to the projects source code, whereas everyone else will be granted that about a month later. Time for me to poke at this project, which I am burning to do. Continue reading “Ghost: Blogging Platform on node.js: I backed!”

Node.js and blinking keyboards

Did you ever want to make your keyboard back light (or any other light source you can control with a bash command) show Morse code?

keyboard_morse_code_nodejs

I have and since I’m primarily back on Linux now, this wasn’t a hard thing to do. For the first time I really looked at executing bash commands from inside node.js. The very quickly written and barely documented source is to be found here: https://github.com/JonathanMH/morse-board Continue reading “Node.js and blinking keyboards”

Blender Guru: rain on glass

The Blender Guru has published an amazing tutorial with photorealistic outcome again, and I quickly wanted to show what he’s been up to this time. Andrew Price is kind of the video-co pilot of the Blender community and creating some really, really beautiful things with it.

Check him out if you’re interested in using Blender, which is actively developed and also very easy possibilities of building render farms with it, when one computer simply isn’t efficient at rendering a scene.

Applab Odense April 2013 recap

The participants, many of them students from the EAL, others from Copenhagen or just volunteering enthusiasts, went on a 24h sprint with Applab.

First, introduction of toolkits, group building and idea generation tasks were on the schedule, followed by a supply of sandwiches and softdrinks.

The theme of the sprint was to utilize the information exposed by institutions within Odense, which up front were listed as possible data sources on the events page. Continue reading “Applab Odense April 2013 recap”